Abstract

This thesis project explores the discourse in Mormon culture addressing Mormon female communities. The discussion is sociological rather than theological and examines the functional characteristics of discourse found in the tradition regarding women. It sets out to review a paradox in the discourse addressing Mormon women that has been documented over time. I examine how this paradox in Mormon discourse establishes and limits women's roles; to do so, I use personal examples and the experience provided by thirteen women whom I interviewed.

The thesis is divided into three main discussions: Community, Discursive Action and Cooperation. My methodology involves a theoretical discussion of discourse and community and observes how discourse helps to create and shape identities with respect to that community. I then use the theoretical discussion to illuminate poignant moments of social texture through collected interviews. My method of ethnography involved tape-recorded interviews with thirteen women. The thesis reviews the women's discourse as representative samples that demonstrate how the paradox has created resistance and sometimes confusion in their own lives. I then make suggestions for addressing particular discursive practices with an eye toward fostering respect and appreciation for and among Mormon women.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2001

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm412

Keywords

Mormon women, Social conditions, Women, Religious aspects, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Sex role

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