Abstract

Many historians have suggested in their writings that much of the social behavior that made the decade of the twenties unique had their origins in the urban centers, leaving the small towns taking no active participation in the Jazz Age.

The purpose of this paper is to show that Provo, Utah, a small, isolated community took a very active part in the Jazz Age, contrary to what has been suggested. There was a considerable quantity of drunkenness, bootlegging, wild dancing and partying in Provo during the decade, much more than historians suggest there should have been in a community the size and location of Provo.

In addition, there was a strong progressive spirit in Provo during an age that is best remembered for its political conservatism.

The prevalent historical thesis that small towns were bone dry and very moral and conservative and backward does not appear to hold true for one small town during the decade, suggesting that other small towns across the nation may not fit the traditional historical stereotype.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1983

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm406

Keywords

Provo, Utah, Social life, customs, Brigham Young University, Mormons, Conduct of life

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