Abstract

Latter-day Saint female missionary activities informally began in the early 1830's, remaining numerically unconstant until 1879, when a significant increase began. Between 1830 and 1898 over two hundred women had been involved in missionary work, laboring mostly in California, New York, Hawaii and England.

Before 1865, Latter-day Saint women did not have any official missionary status. After 1865, Church officials began the practice of setting them apart. Finally, in 1898 women were "certified" as missionaries which placed them on an equal status with their male counterparts.

Some lady missionaries performed household chores, taught school, preached sermons and presided over female auxiliary organizations. There were some who suffered extreme illness and even death. Others experienced dangerous modes of transportation and extremely poor living conditions. The extraordinary faith and courage demonstrated by many Latter-day Saint lady missionaries has rendered an important contribution to the missionary work of the Church.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1976

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm405

Keywords

Mormon women, Mormon missionaries

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