Abstract

The concept of work-family fit has recently emerged in the work and family literature, comparable to work-family balance in that it represents interactions between work and family, and yet distinct from balance in its sense of universal ownership and responsibility. Using Barnett's (1998) model of the work-social system interface as a framework, this study explores the relationship between and predictive factors of work-family fit and work-family balance. Data are from a survey of Brigham Young University's Marriott School of Management (MSM) graduate school alumni (n = 273). Findings indicate that fit and balance are indeed two separate constructs, with fit predicted by the alumni's weekly hours spent in paid employment, paid work status, spouses' age, and total family income. Work satisfaction, frequency of various family activities, and satisfaction with religious practices in marriage were found to predict both fit and balance. Analyses suggest that fit is based on the structural aspects of work-family interactions, while balance appears to be based on the psychological aspects of work and family.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2002

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm401

Keywords

Work, family

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