Abstract

Historians have determined that the visit to London by the early missionary-apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was the greatest disappointment of their proselyting careers. This thesis shows that, though the mission to London was not numerically successful considering the potential conversion, it appealed to the dynamic, energetic, "middling-class" religious seeker who was produced by the strong nonconformist movement indigenous to London. A specific nonconformist group is identified as responding to the preaching of the early apostles. This thesis demonstrates that those few converts kept the Church alive in London during difficult years. It also shows family-style conversion with over fifty-three percent of the London converts emigrating to America.

This thesis introduces the two sides of Greater London as accepted by historians, and shows that this geographic influence was prominent in the choice of lifestyle on the western frontier by the London convert. Most chose to settle along the populated Wasatch front where they were able to pursue their London occupations and introduce London life and culture.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1988

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm388

Keywords

Mormons, England, London, Mormon converts, Emigration, immigration, Religious aspects, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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