Abstract

This interpretive study investigated the "quilt" and its significance to Latter-day Saint Women. Mormon master quilters were chosen because of their knowledge of fabrics, patterns, and symbolism, their skill levels, and their intense interest in quilting. The researcher conducted interviews with the master quilters from July 1995 to April 1996. Field notes were taken and data concerning both observed actions and verbal comments regarding the importance of the quilt were collected, charted, coded, and analyzed.

Several dominant patterns and themes emerged from analyses of the data, including: quilting is an enjoyable and active art form among Mormon women, pattern selection is a personal choice and one of immediate interest to the quilter, Mormon women quilt for personal reasons, textiles are important to the quilting process, and quilts are used for gifts of endearment, financial gain, awards or rewards, and artistic expression. It was determined that Mormon quilters are not significantly different from other quilters. There is only one specific quilt pattern that is unique to the Mormons and not used by other quilt cultures.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1996

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm295

Keywords

Mormon quilts, Quiltmakers, Mormon Church, Influence

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