Abstract

Roughly 1 to 4% of the population engages in self-harm. Superficial self-harm is reported by more young women, than young men. Appropriate responses from family, friends, and other important individuals are a key ingredient in facilitating recovery. Non-therapists, such as family, friends, and school personnel often wish to assist young women who self-harm, but the problem is complex and they are often unsure of how to respond. Current studies primarily focus on the clinical interventions for self-harm, while very few have investigated the perspectives of the individuals who self-harm. This study investigated the perspectives of young women who self-harm in terms of who and what they perceive as helpful when attempting to deal with and/or reduce their self-harming behaviors. Results revealed that participants perceive their friends as the most helpful group. The most preferred helping behaviors included the following: having someone acknowledge the severity of their distress; talking about self-harm with someone who is nonjudgmental and lets them verbalize their feelings; and knowing someone is available.

Degree

EdS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2006-06-22

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd1348

Keywords

self-harm, women, help, self-mutilation, intervention, support, self-report

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