Abstract

The introduction of Mormonism into Great Britain was met with both success and resistence. The major form of British resistence to the Latter-day Saints was through the press. From the introduction of the Church into Great Britain in 1837 to 1860, numerous anti-Mormon pamphlets were published to discourage people from associating with what was considered to be a strange American sect.

The major themes of a number of these tracts have been analyzed in order to gain a better understanding of how the Mormons were perceived by the British. Some of the major themes included the evil character of Joseph Smith; the immorality of the Mormons; and, comparisons between the Mormons and the Muslims. The themes of anti-Mormon pamphlets reflected the attitudes and concerns of the Early Victorian middle class displayed a sense of concern for the vulnernability of social inferiors. Pamphlets published in the 1850s were partly sucessful in creating a negative public image of Mormonism that was disturbing to many practicing saints and impaired missionary work.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1989

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm242

Keywords

Mormon Church, Great Britain, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Pamphleteers, Mormons, Character, Mormonism, Controversial works

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