Abstract

The success of the Juvenile Instructor magazine, called the Instructor since 1929, owes much to the vision and foresight of its great founder, George Quale Cannon. From a small, crude, four-page paper, first published in 1866, the Juvenile Instructor has developed into a far-reaching and attractive publication, touching the lives of countless thousands in 1969. It has proved to be a great implement of religious education to the Latter-day Saint people and fulfilled four important functions in its early years when Elder Cannon was its editor. It served as the official organ of the Sunday Schools, as a voice of truth in an era when so much low-grade fiction was available, as a source of religious reading material for children, and as an aid to parents and teachers in furthering the religious education of the young ones under their care. Its popularity and long life of over a century bespeak the enduring and influential nature of Elder Cannon's edifying combination of information, entertainment, and inspiration.

Degree

MRE

College and Department

Religious Education; Church History and Doctrine

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1969

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm236

Keywords

George Q. Cannon, George Quayle, 1827-1901, Instructor, Deseret Sunday School Union

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