Abstract

During the 19th Century, the Mississippi River was the chief commercial highway in the United States. But for two impediments, the Upper and Lower (Des Moines) Rapids, its entire course of 2400 miles would have offered an untroubled thoroughfare to watercraft.

The federal government, as well as private concerns, attempted throughout the better part of that century to alleviate the river of its barriers and to develop its rapids as a source of power. Those attempts were disappointingly unsuccessful, however, and not until the advent of the 20th Century, when the nation had matured both economically and technologically, was the Mississippi freed of its obstacles and developed on a large scale as a source of energy.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1973

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm215

Keywords

Rapids, Des Moines River, Shipping, Mississippi River, History, 19th century, Water-power, Des Moines River Region

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