Abstract

Only a few hardy men had ventured into America's intermountain west prior to the year 1847. Arriving in this year, the Mormons, under Brigham Young, slowly conquered parts of the Great Basin and within a few years had produced a self-sustaining agricultural economy. production of a surplus in farm products awaited only the emergence of a "foreign" market. This market was soon forthcoming.

The developing process of Utah-Montana relations from 1847 through 1881 was a natural occurance. From the very first, men from Utah traveled northward. The Mormon experiment at Ft. Lemhi during the late 1850's was a prime example of their interest and penetration. Many Utahns were engaged in the Emigrant Road "stock" trade, driving worn-out animals into the Montana valleys to recuperate and returning them south again in the spring.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; History

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1959

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm209

Keywords

Utah, Commerce, History, 19th century, Economic conditions, Montana, Interstate commerce, United States, 19th c

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