Abstract

Writers of nineteenth century Utah generally recognize George Q. Cannon's religious and political influence as second only to that of Brigham Young. Having occupied several positions of importance in the political arena as well as in the Mormon Church, Cannon is a major figure in Utah history whose life and thought merit careful examination.

This treatise is a study of George Q. Cannon's views on the institutions of church and state. After presenting a biographical sketch of Cannon's life, it examines his beliefs regarding the religious clauses in the First Amendment, and the place of revelation, positive law, and majority rule as standards of morality. Also, it considers Cannon's understanding of his obligation as a citizen of his country as well as his right of resistance to positive law which may conflict with divine law. Finally, it evaluates Cannon's predictions of the ultimate disposition of nation states, including the United States, and the establishment of the Kingdom of God preparatory to Christ's Millennial reign.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Political Science

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1977

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm165

Keywords

George Q. Cannon, George Quayle, 1827-1901

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