Abstract

This thesis uses content analysis to compare two conservative Christian feminist publications: Daughters of Sarah, produced by neo-evangelical feminists, and Exponent II, produced by Mormon feminists. Findings are based on insights from three main theories: Debra Minkoff's organization-environment perspective, Nancy Folbre's model of collective action based on structures of constraint, and the church-sect typology from the sociology of religion literature. Although both organizations similarly endeavor to integrate feminist and religious identities, the loose boundaries of evangelicalism allow Daughters of Sarah to explore a more liberal feminist agenda and interact with broader feminist sources while still remaining within the broad domain of evangelicalism. In contrast, the strict organizational boundaries of Mormonism tightly constrain Exponent II's feminist discourse and agenda. While focusing on how religious environments serve as dominant sources of opportunity and constraint for associated organizations, this study also highlights the complexity involved in the construction of christian feminist identities.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1996

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm156

Keywords

Exponent II, Daughters of Sarah, Feminism, Religious aspects, Mormonism, Evangelicalism

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