Abstract

Thirty-nine fathers were observed to determine if they interact differently with their child as a result of the child's sex or birth ordinal position.

Results indicated that fathers expected more of their sons, had a higher readiness of explanation for them, and criticized them more often. Fathers gave more praise, physical contact and supportive behavior to their daughters. Birth ordinal effects paralleled and interacted wiith the child's sex.

Stepwise regression yielded a mean value of 44.16 in explaining the overall variance in dependent variables. It emphasized the number of hours the father spent with his child and family, the father's age, education, and occupation. In comparison to these, the child's sex and ordinal position emerged as having little importance.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1979

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm108

Keywords

Father and child, Birth order

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