Abstract

Moab, located in southeastern Utah, began as an agricultural village, in accordance with the economy of early Utah. However, Moab's growth was limited by a restricted physical site. The purpose of this study is to trace the development of the economic functions of Moab in relation to its resource base. Despite the physical limitations of the area, agriculture remained the chief economic activity up to the mid-twentieth century. Periodic booms in speculative mining were only temporary and not significant to the permant economy of the community.

However, in the 1950s, a spectacular uranium boom brought unprecedented growth to the town. As the uranium boom slackened, economic and population decline threatened the town's new status. Potash production and tourist-service industries emerged to buoy up the sagging economy. Although the economy was aided by the addition of other activities, the sectors of the economy still remained disproportionately unbalanced in comparison to the norm. The future economic stability of the community remains questionable unless balance can be attained.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Geography

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

1973

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etdm88

Keywords

Moab, Utah, Economic conditions, Elk Mountain Mission, Mormons, Moab Utah

Share

COinS