Abstract

Relationship self-regulation (RSR) refers to the “work”, or effort and strategies, that partners put into keeping their relationships healthy. Past RSR research has not taken into account distal and proximal variables that may affect RSR, such as parental and current relationship avoidant conflict-resolution style (CRS). In this study, we examine the relationships between parental avoidant CRS and current relationship avoidant CRS, as well as self-report of RSR in the relationship. Additionally, the perception of one's partner's attachment behaviors consisting of responsiveness, engagement, and accessibility is included in the model to test for moderation of the relationship between current relationship avoidant conflict-resolution style and RSR. Using data from 2,228 males and 2,228 females who were in their first marriages and completed the RELATionship Evaluation (RELATE) (Busby et al., 2001), we found that there was a high positive correlation between parental avoidant CRS and current avoidant CRS. Avoidant CRS was also significantly negatively correlated with RSR. Finally, we found that perception of partner's attachment behaviors did not moderate the negative relationship between avoidant CRS and RSR. Implications for future research and clinicians are discussed.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Marriage and Family Therapy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2015-03-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7651

Keywords

conflict resolution style, accessibility, responsiveness, engagement, relationship self-regulation

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