Abstract

The demand for economical, efficient protein production, reuse, and recovery has never been greater due to their versatility in a large variety of applications ranging from industrial chemical manufacturing to pharmaceutical drug production. The applications for naturally and artificially produced proteins include protein drugs and other pharmaceutical products, as biocatalysts in environmentally friendly chemical manufacturing, as enzymes for food processing purposes, and as an essential component in many biomedical devices. However, protein production suffers from many challenges, which include the cost of production, protein stability especially under harsh conditions, and recoverability and reusability of the proteins. The combination of two developing technologies, cell-free protein synthesis systems (CFPS) and unnatural amino acid incorporation, provides solutions to these protein production challenges.This dissertation reports on the use of cell-free protein synthesis systems and unnatural amino acid incorporation to develop new proteins and enzyme immobilization techniques that significantly increase activity and stability while simplifying recoverability and reuse.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Life Sciences; Microbiology and Molecular Biology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2014-12-01

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7480

Keywords

Synthetic biology, biocatalysis, enzyme immobilization, cell-free synthetic biology, green manufacturing, protein immobilization, click chemistry

Included in

Microbiology Commons

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