Abstract

Previous research has found paraeducators do not receive adequate training (Giangreco,Broer, & Edelman, 2002), and are often infrequently evaluated –yearly or less often (Mueller, 2002; Morgan, Ashbaker, & Young, 2001). Little is known about principals' practices relative to paraeducator training, and evaluation. To investigate these topics, a survey was distributed to principals that worked in a large suburban/rural school district in the western United States. Fifty-eight participants completed surveys at a district principals meeting. The results of the study indicated a large majority of principals (78.95% for Title 1 paraeducators, 86.21% for special education paraeducators, and 75.86 for others) hired the paraeducators in their school and most principals (88.89% for Title 1 paraeducators, 86.21% for special education paraeducators, and 60.34% for other paraeducators) were aware of district policies regarding the hiring and/or employment of paraeducators. In contrast, the majority of principals were not aware of individual school policies pertaining to paraeducator hiring and employment. The majority of principals did not indicate that they were responsible for rating paraeducator performance. Furthermore, the majority of principals did not perform paraeducator observations, hold evaluative conferences, or link the results of paraeducator evaluation to professional development.

Degree

EdS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6720

Keywords

Paraeducator, Paraprofessional, Teacher Aide, Principal, Administrator, Hiring, Evaluation, Supervision, Training, Professional Development

Share

COinS