Abstract

Jumping ability in volleyball players is crucial to a team's success. There are both muscular and neural components in jumping. Coaches often test jumping ability and body composition prior to the start of the competitive season, but many fail to monitor these important variables during the course of the season. Jumping ability can decrease over the course of the season as the focus moves from strength training in the weight room to skill development on the court. It is imperative that players maintain their jumping ability and body composition over the course of the season. Seasonal changes in elite-male volleyball players were determined by testing the players body composition, spike jump, block jump and lower body power index at three distinct time points: prior to the first game, during their bye-week, and at the end of their regular season. It was found that these players were able to maintain their vertical jump and lower body power index. Also, those who were deemed players (those who played throughout the course of the season) had lower body fat percentages and higher jump scores. These results will aid coaches in understanding the changes that occur over the course of the season in elite-male collegiate volleyball players.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Exercise Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-12-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6652

Keywords

spike jump, block jump, lower body power index, volleyball

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