Abstract

This study used Ajzen's (1991) Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to explore Polynesian student-athletes' motivation to improve academic performance (AP), while participating in Division I (D1) college football. Specifically, this study examined how attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control influence motivation to achieve a higher GPA. Furthermore, ethnic identity, family obligation and cultural values were examined as potential contributors to subjective norms. The sample consisted of 70 Polynesian football student-athletes at 10 U.S. D1 universities. A modified TPB questionnaire was used to assess the TPB variables (attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control) as contributors to Polynesian football student-athletes academic, athletic, and career motivation toward achieving a higher GPA. A factor analysis indicated family obligation and cultural values were contributors to subjective norm. Further, a stepwise regression analysis indicated subjective norm was a consistent predictor of academic, athletic, and career motivation. Positive relationships were also found between perceived behavioral control and athletic motivation, as well as, attitude and academic motivation. Although AP was not predicted in this study, findings highlight the impact of Polynesian football student-athletes perceived social pressure from family and culture on their academic, athletic, and career motivations. Findings provide implications for advisors, administrators, and scholars.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Marriott School of Management; Recreation Management

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2014-07-10

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7252

Keywords

motivation, academic performance, minority, student-athlete, Polynesian

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