Abstract

Voice is an important tool for communication. Consequently, voice disorders tend to severely diminish quality of life. Voice research seeks to understand the physics that govern voice production to improve treatment of voice disorders. This thesis develops a method for creating complex synthetic laryngeal models and obtaining flow data within these complex models. The method uses Computed Tomography (CT) scan data to create silicone models of the larynx. Index of refraction matching allows flow field data to be collected within a synthetic complex larynx, which had previously been impossible. A short proof-of-concept of the method is set forth. Details on the development of a mechanically-driven synthetic model are presented. Particle image velocimetry was used to collect flow field data in a complex and a simplified supraglottal model to study the effect of complex geometry on the supraglottal jet. Axis switching and starting and closing vortices were observed. The thesis results are anticipated to aid in better understanding flow structures present during voice production.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Mechanical Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2014-07-01

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7152

Keywords

voice production, larynx, mechanically-driven vocal folds, supraglottal jet

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