Abstract

Cormac McCarthy's representation of the comic theories of the carnivalesque, incongruity, and absurdism by the antagonists of Blood Meridian and No Country for Old Men demonstrates the unique and ostensible power of humor over (or at least, its awareness of and reconciliation to the absurdity of) death; it also emphasizes the supreme power and influence of humor as a means for destroying other institutions and philosophies which claim knowledge or authority but fail to sustain individuals in times of crisis. This makes humor a formidable factor in determining and justifying the outcome of human interactions and in defining the strengths and limitations of McCarthy's antagonists.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; Humanities, Classics, and Comparative Literature

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2014-06-12

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd7026

Keywords

Cormac McCarthy, humor, Blood Meridian, No Country for Old Men, Judge Holden, Anton Chigurh, carnivalesque, incongruity, absurdism

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