Abstract

The dose-effect relationship in psychotherapy has been examined extensively, but few studies have included session frequency as a component of psychotherapy "dose." Those studies that have examined the effects of session frequency have indicated that it may affect both the total amount of recovery and the speed of recovery. No studies were found examining the clinical significance of this construct in a naturalistic setting. The change trajectories of 16,003 clients were examined using multi-level modeling and including session frequency as a fixed effect. Of these clients, subgroups were identified that were scheduled approximately once a week or approximately once every two weeks. These groups were compared to each other for differences in speed of recovery and clinically significant change. Results indicated that more frequent therapy was associated with steeper recovery curves. When comparing groups scheduled once a week to those scheduled once every two weeks, more clinically significant gains were identified in those attending once a week, and more significant deterioration was identified in those attending once every two weeks. These findings are discussed in light of the existing literature and the implications for future psychotherapy research and clinical practice.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-05-20

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6181

Keywords

frequency, psychotherapy, outcome, dose-response, dose-effect

Included in

Psychology Commons

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