Abstract

Microphone arrays are useful for measuring acoustic energy quantities (e.g. acoustic intensity) in the near-field of a full-scale solid rocket motor. Proper characterization of a rocket plume as a noise source will allow for more accurate predictions in engineering models that design for protection of structures, payloads and personnel near the rockets. Acoustic intensity and energy density quantities were measured in three rocket noise fields and have shown that the apparent source region of the rocket becomes smaller and moves upstream as frequency increases. Theoretical results accounting for some scattering and finite-difference errors arising in these types of energy-based measurements have been previously discussed by other authors. This thesis includes results from laboratory experiments which confirm some of this previous theoretical work as well as gives insight into the physical limitation of specific microphone array designs. Also, calibrations for both magnitude and directional response of the microphones are demonstrated. Of particular interest is the efficacy of phase calibration of array microphones for the low-frequency regime below 200 Hz.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Physics and Astronomy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-03-22

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6123

Keywords

acoustics, intensity, energy density, low-frequency, calibration, rocket noise

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