Abstract

Delaminations in concrete bridge decks result primarily from corrosion of the reinforcing bars (or rebar). This corrosion leads to volumetric expansion of the rebar. When the rebar expands, concrete cracks, and there is a localized separation of the concrete cover from the underlying concrete. Impact-echo testing is an effective technique to map delaminations on concrete bridge decks. However, mapping speed is limited by necessary retrieval of the impactor for traditional tests. To achieve higher scanning speeds, it is advantageous to use both a non-contact measurement (air-coupled impact-echo) and disposable-impactor excitation. Disposable impactors have the potential advantage of achieving greater deck scanning speeds because they do not need to be retrieved, and they can also be used with air-coupled measurement systems. This thesis reports impact excitation of concrete using disposable impactors such as water droplets and ice balls. The impact characteristics of these impactors are compared with those of steel balls and chain links. Comparing the acoustic recordings on intact and delaminated concrete surface shows that water droplets and ice balls are able to excite flexural resonant modes associated with delamination defects. The use of water droplets and ice balls for shallow delamination detection in concrete is thus demonstrated.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Electrical and Computer Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-12-14

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6674

Keywords

concrete, corrosion, delamination, bridge deck, air-coupled, impact-echo, disposable impactors, flexural mode

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