Abstract

An intensive sampling of all ant species encountered on 6 Hawaiian Islands: Big Island, Maui, Oahu, Kauai, Molokai, and Lanai took place between 1988 and 1996. Species presence and absence was recorded at each site. Using remote sensing, variables were added insitu and used throughout my analysis. Species accumulation curves suggest that sampling was comprehensive. There is a significant trend between island area and species richness which validates the Theory of Island Biogeography for invasive species. Islands were found to be significantly nested by area, order, and tourism. Cluster analysis shows a link between elevation, land-use and island, and species presence. Predictive models can be built to predict spread of particular ant species as they continue toward equilibrium.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Life Sciences; Plant and Wildlife Sciences

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-12-07

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5804

Keywords

biological invasions, Formicidae, invasive species, species accumulation, species richness, island biogeography, remote sensing, predictive modeling, hyperniche, nestedness

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