Abstract

Past research and views on shame have indicated that shame has detrimental effects for adolescent development. Little research has focused on the pathways in which shame may affect adolescent traits. Even less studies examine what variables may moderate the effects of shame. Using adolescent self-report questionnaires, this study examined the relationship between adolescent shame and depression, self-esteem, and hope. In addition, this study examined the moderating effect maternal, paternal, and best friend relationships have between shame and adolescent outcome variables. A structural equation moderation model analysis was fit to data from 307 two-parent families. The average age of adolescents for the study was 15.31 years of age. Results indicated that there was a strong positive correlations between shame and depression and a strong inverse correlation between shame and hope and self-esteem. Gender differences were also observed with boys' results having significance with depression while girls' results corresponded with the hope variable. Adolescents' connection with same gender parent along with best friend connection moderated the detrimental effect shame has on adolescent outcomes. Suggestions for clinicians to be mindful of shame and adolescent relationships within the family and social system are given. Possible interventions in the adolescent family and social system are suggested.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage and Family Therapy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-08-14

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6504

Keywords

shame, adolescent connection, depression, hope, self-esteem

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