Abstract

Bullying is a serious issue that exists not only in the United States but in other countries as well. There are significant, and often devastating, implications for both the bully and the victim. This research focused on the perspectives of teachers, principals, and counselors related to bullying in two elementary schools in Utah and Mexico. Through semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions and archival records, this qualitative study explored different perspectives on bullying found in two schools exhibiting approximately the same student and teacher demographics. Interviews with teachers, counselors and principals allowed for comparison of differences and similarities between both locations. Consistent themes developed throughout the study regarding the issue of bullying and how it was addressed differently at each site. Many of these differences stemmed from three main elements. The main elements that emerged were the contrast in training that was provided to teachers, the role of the principal, and the support for educators practicing the strategies they were taught. In addition, differences were also found in the understanding of the law and policies surrounding bullying.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Educational Leadership and Foundations

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-07-10

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6475

Keywords

bullying, bully, victim, teachers, educators, principals, counselors, solutions, trainings, elementary school, and cultural influence

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