Abstract

Non-invasive blood analysis devices that can measure characteristics less prominent than the oxygenation of hemoglobin are of interest in the medical community. An important step in creating these devices is to model the interaction of photons with human tissue in increasingly greater physiological detail. We have modeled, using a Monte Carlo technique, the interaction of photons through epidermis, blood and water arranged both in layers and in a homogeneous mixture. We confirm the expected linear relation between photon attenuation and material volumetric percentage in our two-layer models. We discovered that this relationship becomes non-linear in the homogeneously mixed models where volumetric percentage must be replaced with interaction volume percentage. These nonlinearities become significant when the values of the interaction coefficient, µt, differ by an order of magnitude or more and could prove crucial in accurately reading oxygenation or other constituents in the blood and also in modeling radiation delivered to a patient in photodynamic therapy.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Physics and Astronomy

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-06-12

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6254

Keywords

Monte Carlo modeling, light propagation, human tissue, layered, homogeneous mix, non-invasive

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