Abstract

Research examining the psychotherapy outcomes of sexual minority clients seen in routine clinical care is lacking. No studies could be identified in which sexual minority client outcomes were examined with a standardized measure. The pre-treatment mental health functioning of 600 sexual minority clients was compared with that of a randomly selected group matched to the minority group on male/female ratio. The post-treatment mental health functioning of 596 sexual minority clients was also examined and compared to a control group matched on female/male ratio, initial levels of mental health functioning, age, and marital status. Results indicated that sexual minority clients who reported experiencing distress regarding their sexual identity/orientation at intake evidenced significantly higher levels of psychological distress than the randomly selected group pre-treatment. No significant differences between sexual minority and control clients in overall mental health functioning was found post-treatment and sexual minorities in the sample evidenced treatment gains that were similar to control group clients when initial levels of functioning were matched. Sexual minority females reported experiencing more frequent suicidal thoughts pre- and post-treatment. Implications for psychotherapy in routine clinical care are discussed and recommendations for future research are offered.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-07-11

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5516

Keywords

sexual minority, LGBQ, psychotherapy, outcome, treatment, suicide

Included in

Psychology Commons

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