Abstract

The author presents the successful development of an on-chip, monolithic, integrated rubidium vapor-cell. These vapor-cells integrate ridge waveguide techniques with hollow-core waveguiding technology known as Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides (ARROWs). These devices are manufactured on-site in BYU's Integrated Microelectronic Laboratory (IML) using common silicon wafer microfabrication techniques. The ARROW platform fabrication is outlined, but the bulk of the dissertation focuses on novel packaging techniques that allow for the successful introduction and sealing of rubidium vapor into these micro-sized vapor-cells. The unique geometries and materials utilized in the ARROW platform render common vapor-cell sealing techniques unusable. The development of three generations of successful vapor-cells is chronicled. The sealing techniques represented in these three generations of vapor-cells include high-temperature epoxy seals, cold-weld copper crimping, variable pressure vacuum capabilities, indium solder seals, and electroplated passivation coatings. The performance of these seals are quantified using accelerated lifetime tests combined with optical spectroscopy. Finally, the successful probing of the rubidium absorption spectrum, electromagnetically induced transparency, and slow light on the ARROW-based vapor-cell platform is reported.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Electrical and Computer Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-05-22

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6183

Keywords

John F. Hulbert, Aaron R. Hawkins, atomic vapor, vapor-cell, slow light, electromagnetically induced transparency, rubidium, electroplating, ARROW, indium, lab-on-a-chip, microfabrication, spectroscopy, waveguide, optic

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