Abstract

Interviews were conducted with 44 highly religious women from three demographics: Mennonite, Evangelical Christians and Cajun Catholics. The results provide insight into the reasons that faith appears to play a part in making motherwork a deliberate choice for many women. Comparing and contrasting the interviews within and between demographics as well as allowing for the influences of modern academia and media on attitudes toward motherwork grants voice to these often marginalized religious minorities. The resulting analysis shows that all of these women, to varying degrees, find value in motherwork. Each group seemed to have a perspective of this work which was unique between and yet common within the specific demographic. Across groups was a pronounced unity of thought that motherwork is profoundly important and that one is culpable before God in her execution of this potentially divine work

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage, Family, and Human Development

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-03-18

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6064

Keywords

religion, women, mother, God, motherwork, Mennonite, Cajun, Evangelical

Share

COinS