Abstract

In this thesis I consider photographs of the mannequin by Vogue's fashion photographer, George Hoyningen-Huene. Little scholarship has been written on Huene, as well as many other fashion photographers of the twentieth century. I examine four of Huene's works and his appropriation of the surrealist aesthetic, specifically the use of the mask and mannequin, which were directed at female spectators during the interwar atmosphere and development of the identity of the interwar modern woman. These images include Life-mask of Dolores Wilkinson (1933), Antoine with One of His Creations (1933), Scarf and Gloves by Chanel, Mannequin by Pierre Imans (1934) and Mauboussin Diamond-and-Topaz Corsage Clip, Mannequin by Pierre Imans (1934). I argue that his use of the mask and mannequin legitimates his work as he draws from the artistic milieu of nineteenth and twentieth-century high art.My survey describes photography's theoretical affinities with fashion and surrealism, the surrealist aesthetic and Huene's adoption of it in his fashion photographs of the mannequin, primitivism and Huene's adoption of high art themes and use of the mask, the interwar modern woman in a consumer society, female spectatorship and Huene's surrealist images functioning through a female gaze.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Visual Arts

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2013-03-25

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd6134

Keywords

George Hoyningen-Huene, fashion photography, surrealism, twentieth-century photography, Vogue

Included in

Art Practice Commons

Share

COinS