Abstract

Although there is general agreement that feedback plays an important role in student performance, the majority of the studies found in the research literature explore the impact of different types of feedback in a traditional and university-level setting. In order to explore the impact of different feedback types in a non-traditional distance learning setting, 352 high school students enrolled in courses offered through BYU's Independent Study (IS) department received either delayed feedback or immediate feedback generated by Speedback™, BYU's automated grading and feedback program, depending on whether they had opted to submit end of unit assignments by mail or computer. Results of a comparison of final exam scores indicated that those students receiving immediate feedback performed significantly better on course final exams, but surprisingly those who received delayed feedback completed course in significantly less time.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Instructional Psychology and Technology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2005-12-19

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd1154

Keywords

feedback, delayed feedback, immediate feedback, independent study, high school independent study

Share

COinS