Abstract

The faunal remains of large game such as mule deer, pronghorn, and mountain sheep are abundant at Fremont sites, as are jackrabbits and cottontails. The proportions of these species in Fremont faunal assemblages fluctuate through time. Explanations for these variations range from resource depression to communal activities. This thesis provides the results of the faunal analysis from three previously unreported sites. Paragonah (42IN43), Summit (42IN40), and Parowan (42IN100) are large Fremont sites in the Parowan Valley located 20 miles north of Cedar City in Utah. The purpose of this thesis is to determine if the variations in the faunal assemblage provide evidence for resource depression or feasting. I identify patterns or variation among the assemblages and determine that there is no evidence for resource depression. Evidence for feasting is present, indicating at least two possible feasting events occurred at the Paragonah site.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Anthropology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-07-06

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5455

Keywords

Native Americans, Utah, Parowan Valley, Fremont, feasting, resource depression

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Anthropology Commons

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