Abstract

This study examined the effect of low doses of interactive therapy with a robot on the basic social engagement skills of four children with autism in interaction with an unfamiliar adult. The current study was part of a larger work investigating the effects of treatment incorporating a robot on the social engagement behaviors of children with autism. A single-subject, multiple-baseline research design was implemented and included four types of sessions: baseline, traditional intervention, intervention including the robot, and follow-up. Each participant received a total of 20 intervention sessions in addition to baseline and follow-up sessions. Intervention with the robot was conducted during 10 minutes of 50-minute therapy sessions. The remaining 40 minutes were spent providing highly interactive, play-based therapy similar to that conducted in traditional treatment sessions. Pre- and post-intervention measures of social engagement behaviors were taken and compared. Results indicated that most social engagement behaviors measured remained relatively constant or decreased over the course of the study. Reciprocal and collaborative actions in the context of turn-taking and singing activities, however, increased in three of the four participants. Implications of these results are discussed and suggestions for further research are offered.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Communication Disorders

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-08-08

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5592

Keywords

autism, intervention, robot, social engagement

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