Abstract

The rate of fear of victimization has declined in recent years but remains a prevalent problem among adolescents. Fear has been explained in past literature by three main theories: victimization theory, social integration theory, and social disorganization theory. However, the prediction of fear of victimization can be done more concisely by the contribution of collective efficacy, a concept that combines a community's feelings of social cohesion with a willingness to intervene for the common good. Using data collected from Philadelphia middle schools in 1993-1994, this study tested the direct and interacting effects of bullying and collective efficacy on fear of victimization with hierarchical linear modeling. The results indicated that bullying is positively related to fear of victimization, and collective efficacy is negatively related to fear of victimization. Contrary to the hypothesis, the moderating effect of collective efficacy on bullying and fear was not statistically significant. Implications for policy and future research are discussed.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-06-12

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5324

Keywords

collective efficacy, bullying, fear, school, adolescence

Included in

Sociology Commons

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