Abstract

The objectives of this research were to investigate the sensitivity of two-prong and fourprong resistivity measurements to certain operator-controlled variables and to conduct a direct comparison of the sensitivity of two-prong and four-prong resistivity measurements to certain concrete material variables. Four full-factorial experiments were designed for this research. In the experimentation on operator-controlled variables with two-prong resistivity testing, main effects that are both statistically significant and practically important include hole depth and surface water. In the experimentation on operator-controlled variables with four-prong resistivity testing, probe position, surface water, and prong spacing are all neither statistically significant nor practically important. This high degree of unexplained variation may be of concern to practitioners. In the experimentation on concrete material variables with two-prong and four-prong resistivity testing, main effects that are both statistically significant and practically important include chloride concentration and temperature, both of which exhibit inverse relationships with resistivity. These research findings support several important recommendations for resistivity testing. Operators of the two-prong resistivity device should use an accurately positioned drill stop to ensure that the prepared holes are consistently the correct depth, and they should expect to obtain different values depending on the presence of surface water on the deck surface. Operators considering use of the four-prong resistivity device should not expect the measurements to be sensitive to probe position with respect to rebar, presence of surface water, or prong spacing for conditions similar to those investigated in this research. Operators interested in monitoring resistivity values over time to ascertain material changes in a bridge deck should develop protocols for measuring concrete temperature in the field and subsequently normalizing resistivity measurements to a standard temperature.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Civil and Environmental Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-04-18

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5207

Keywords

bridge deck testing, chloride concentration, concrete durability, electrical resistivity, non-destructive testing, reinforcing steel corrosion

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