Abstract

Scholars have not adequately explained the disparity between Arthur Golding's career as a fervent Protestant translator of continental reformers like John Calvin and Theodore Beza with his most famous translation, Ovid's Metamorphoses. His motivations for completing the translation included a nationalistic desire to enrich the English language and the rewards of the courtly system of patronage. Considering the Protestant opposition to pagan and wanton literature, it is apparent that Golding was forced to carefully contain the dangerous material of his translation. Golding avoids Protestant criticism of traditional allegorical readings of pagan poetry by adjusting his translation to show that Ovid was inspired by the Bible and meant his poem to be morally and theologically instructive in the Christian tradition. Examples of Golding's technic include his translation of the creation and the great deluge from Book One, and the story of Myrrha from Book Ten.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Humanities; English

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-03-13

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5100

Keywords

Arthur Golding, Ovid, Metamorphoses, allegory, translation, religion

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