Abstract

Behavioral animation has become popular for creating virtual characters that are autonomous agents and thus self-animating. This is useful for lessening the workload of human animators, populating virtual environments with interactive agents, etc. Unfortunately, current behavioral animation techniques suffer from three key problems: (1) deliberative behavioral models (i.e., cognitive models) are slow to execute; (2) interactive virtual characters cannot adapt online due to interaction with a human user; (3) programming of behavioral models is a difficult and time-intensive process. This dissertation presents a collection of papers that seek to overcome each of these problems. Specifically, these issues are alleviated through novel machine learning schemes. Problem 1 is addressed by using fast regression techniques to quickly approximate a cognitive model. Problem 2 is addressed by a novel multi-level technique composed of custom machine learning methods to gather salient knowledge with which to guide decision making. Finally, Problem 3 is addressed through programming-by-demonstration, allowing a non technical user to quickly and intuitively specify agent behavior.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Computer Science

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2005-04-20

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd806

Keywords

computer animation, behavioral animation, character animation, synthetic characters, behavioral modeling, cognitive modeling, machine learning, reinforcement learning, programming by demonstration, autonomous agents, AI-based animation, computer games, training simulators

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