Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine leisure patterns and meanings of leisure among families in the developing East African nation of Uganda, in response to recent calls for more non-Western leisure studies (Chick, 1998; Iwasaki, Nishino, Onda & Bowling, 2007). The three focus questions answered in this study were: (a) what do Ugandans from the Mukono District think leisure is? (b) how is family leisure, in their terms, happening? and (c) in what ways do they think family leisure is important? This study utilized a grounded theory methodology (Glaser & Strauss, 1978) with qualitative data analysis methods. Sixty-eight secondary students and five family units were interviewed. The data were analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding. Results indicate Ugandan definitions of leisure are similar to Western definitions. Additionally, Ugandan families participate in activities similar to Western families. Students mentioned five primary family leisure outcomes (enjoyment/fun, personal development, family development, health, and relaxation) that point toward a core theme. Fortifying describes the importance Ugandan students and family members place upon family leisure outcomes that strengthen the individual to overcome inevitable challenges they will face throughout their lives and enable them to succeed. Additionally, participants frequently mentioned the role of family socializing activities, such as discussion and story-telling, in contributing to important family leisure outcomes.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Marriott School of Management; Recreation Management

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-11-19

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4058

Keywords

Uganda, family recreation, Western recreation, resilience

Share

COinS