Abstract

Research suggests a compelling correlation between teacher behavior and effective learning environments (Sutherland & Morgan, 2003; Brophy & Good, 1986). Focusing on the evidence-based teaching skill of offering behavior-specific praise (BSP), the researcher worked with 3 elementary-level general educators in a tiered model of instruction, commonly known as response to intervention (RtI). Although RtI commonly provides targeted instructional support to students, this study, a systematic replication of Myers, Simonsen and Sugai (2011), used the RtI framework to provide professional development to teachers. The researcher also tracked the behavior of 3 students, identified by the teachers as having behavioral difficulties, who became the focus of each teacher's BSP. Results showed rapid and somewhat sustained increases in rates of BSP following the Tier 2 and 3 interventions (video self-monitoring and peer coaching), but not following the Tier 1 intervention (schoolwide in-service training). Averages for all 3 students' on-task behavior increased with increased teacher BSP. Implications for educators, administrators, and researchers are discussed.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-08-11

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4760

Keywords

behavior-specific praise, response to intervention, faculty peer coaching, video self-monitoring, professional development

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