Abstract

Eating disorders are a widespread problem that affects millions of people each year in the United States. Research-based prevention programs are becoming more and more important as this number rises. This study qualitatively examined the effectiveness of a prevention program called Eating Disorders: Physical, Social, and Emotional Consequences, A High School Curriculum about Anorexia, Bulimia, and Compulsive Eating (EDPSEC). Study participants included 10 female students in a ninth grade health class in a junior high school in Utah. The integrity of curriculum administration was analyzed and interviews were conducted. The aim of the interviews was to determine what students who received the curriculum felt about the program and eating disorders in general. Results indicate that while treatment integrity was considered low (45%), students still found value in the curriculum and enjoyed participating in it. While a wider sample size and concurrent quantitative data are needed to further support these findings, this student indicates that the EDPSEC program is a viable option for implementing an eating disorder prevention curriculum in the secondary school setting.

Degree

EdS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-07-05

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4554

Keywords

eating disorders, school curriculum, prevention

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