Abstract

This thesis adds to the knowledge base of constant-force mechanisms (CFMs). It begins by reviewing past work done in the area of CFMs and then develops new nondimensionalized parameters that are used to simplify the calculations required to design a CFM. Comparison techniques are then developed that utilize these non-dimensionalized parameters to compare mechanisms based on stiffnesses, percent constant-force, actual lengths, normal displacements, and feasible design orientations. These comparison techniques are then combined with optimization to define new mechanisms with improved performance and range of capabilities. This thesis also outlines a design process, methods to identify mechanisms that are suitable for a given design problem, and relationships and trends between variables. The thesis concludes by discussing the adaptation of CFMs for use in electrical contacts and presenting the results of a design case study which successfully developed a constant-force electrical contact (CFEC).

Degree

MS

College and Department

Ira A. Fulton College of Engineering and Technology; Mechanical Engineering

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2002-11-08

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd137

Keywords

Compliant, Mechanism, Pseudo Rigid Body Model, Constant-Force, Compliant Mechanism, Near Constant-Force, Constant Force, PRBM

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