Abstract

Although self-directed marriage and relationship education (MRE) has the potential to reach a larger or different audience than traditional MRE, little has been done to examine the characteristics of those who access self-directed materials. This study examined individual, couple, family, and sociocultural context variables that predicted participation in both self-directed and traditional MRE programs. A series of logistic regressions were conducted using SPSS 19.0. Different factors predicted participation for each intervention. For self-directed programs, those who were older, more educated, more religious, less materialistic, whose partners were more neurotic, who had been dating for a shorter amount of time, and who had poorer relationships with their mothers were more likely to participate, while a wider range of factors predicted participation in traditional programs. Family life educators should consider creating self-directed materials designed to reach a wider audience.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Family Life; Marriage, Family, and Human Development

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-02-28

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4999

Keywords

marriage and relationship education, marriage preparation programs, self-directed

Share

COinS