Abstract

In this article, I examine the notion that perceptions of media have a perceived effect on performance and morale on both the athlete and the team. I test this idea on a sample of college athletes at Nicholls State University (N=94), at the end of the 2011-2012 school year. Findings show that the presumed media influence is displayed in the context of athletics and that there are some indirect effects from one's perceptions of how their teammates were portrayed in the media. Research found that positive media had a perceived effect on the team but not on ones' self. Findings also showed that positive and negative media can be a predictor of overall team performance. Nothing was found to support the idea that positive or negative media had an impact on personal performance or morale. Nothing was found that gave credence to the fact that perception of media whether positive or negative has an impact on personal or team morale.

Degree

MA

College and Department

Fine Arts and Communications; Communications

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2012-08-10

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd5624

Keywords

Presumed media influence, Third-person, Pygmalion effect, perceptions, athletics

Included in

Communication Commons

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