Abstract

Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used for surface modification. Alkylsilane monolayers are one of the most widely deposited and studied SAMs. My work focuses on the preparation, patterning, and application of alkysilane monolayers. 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) is one of the most popular silanes used to make active surfaces for surface modification. To possibly improve the surface physical properties and increase options for processing this material, I prepared and studied a series of amino silane surfaces on silicon/silicon dioxide from APTES and two other related silanes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). I also explored CVD of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane on silicon and quartz. Several deposition conditions were investigated. Results show that properties of silane monolayers are quite consistent under different conditions. For monolayer patterning, I developed a new and extremely rapid technique, which we termed laser activation modification of semiconductor surfaces or LAMSS. This method consists of wetting a semiconductor surface with a reactive compound and then firing a highly focused nanosecond pulse of laser light through the transparent liquid onto the surface. The high peak power of the pulse at the surface activates the surface so that it reacts with the liquid with which it is in contact. I also developed a new application for monolayer patterning. I built a technologically viable platform for producing protein arrays on silicon that appears to meet all requirements for industrial application including automation, low cost, and high throughput. This method used microlens array (MA) patterning with a laser to pattern the surface, which was followed by protein deposition. Stencil lithography is a good patterning technique compatible with monolayer modification. Here, I added a new patterning method and accordingly present a simple, straightforward procedure for patterning silicon based on plasma oxidation through a stencil mask. We termed this method subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS).

Degree

PhD

College and Department

Physical and Mathematical Sciences; Chemistry and Biochemistry

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-12-15

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4151

Keywords

protein arrays, micropatterning, chemical vapor deposition, silane, polyaniline

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