Abstract

Research has shown that by 7-months of age infants demonstrate recognition of emotion by successfully matching faces and voices based on affect in an intermodal matching procedure. It is often assumed that once an ability is present the development of that ability has "ceased." Therefore, no research has examined if and how the ability to match faces and voices based on affect develops after the first 7-months. This study examined how the ability to match faces and voices based on affect changes from 7- to 12-months. Looking at infant's proportion of total looking time (PTLT) results showed that, consistent with previous research, 7-month-old infants looked significantly longer at the affectively congruent facial expression. However, 12-month- olds showed no matching of faces and voices. Further analyses showed that 7-month-olds also increased their looking to facial expressions while being presented with the affectively congruent vocal expression. Once again, 12-month-olds failed to show significant matching. That 7-month- olds were able to demonstrate matching while 12-month-olds failed to do so is possibly a result of 12-month-olds attending to other information. More research is needed to better understand how infants' recognition of affect and overall perceptual abilities change as they develop.

Degree

MS

College and Department

Family, Home, and Social Sciences; Psychology

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-06-30

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4536

Keywords

infant affect recognition, intermodal matching, intersensory redundancy hypothesis

Included in

Psychology Commons

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