Abstract

Children with language impairment (LI) have demonstrated several language problems, including receptive and expressive deficits. A growing body of research has further demonstrated emotion understanding and, more specifically, emotion inferencing deficits that negatively affect the ability of this population to use language successfully in social interactions. Consequently, the present study examines social communication intervention focused on improving emotion inferencing for children with a diagnosis of LI or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), as similar social communication deficits are occasionally seen in children with these diagnoses. Study participants were identified from the caseload of a practicing certified speech-language pathologist (SLP) and qualified for intervention based upon Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL) and Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT) scores. Participant ability to perform an emotion inferencing task was then compared pre- and post-treatment with descriptive statistics and presented as 6 individual case studies to determine the effectiveness of social communication intervention. Results are presented pre- and post-intervention and indicated that emotion inferencing capacities for a given scenario increased for some participants, while others demonstrated either modest gains or slight declines in performance after intervention.

Degree

MS

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Communication Disorders

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2011-08-10

Document Type

Thesis

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd4750

Keywords

social communication, social skills, emotion understanding, emotion inferencing

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