Abstract

The Group Selection Questionnaire (GSQ; Cox et al., 2004) is a measure that has been developed to facilitate clinical decisions about a client's readiness for group psychotherapy. The GSQ has demonstrated an ability to predict which clients will experience a reduction in distress through the use of group psychotherapy. This dissertation examines the Group Selection Questionnaire's ability to measure client characteristics that predict the client's ability to benefit from receiving group psychotherapy compared to the ability to benefit from receiving another form of treatment, such as individual or a combination of individual and group psychotherapy, as measured by improved scores on the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45; Lambert, Gregersen, Burlingame, & Maruish, 2004). Archival data was analyzed using scores from a sample of 156 college-age participants. Multiple regressions showed that the GSQ and its subscales were effective at predicting improvement in symptomatic distress, but did not demonstrate an ability to predict who would benefit more from group, compared to individual or mixed modalities. Limitations of the study, implications for the measure, and future research are discussed.

Degree

PhD

College and Department

David O. McKay School of Education; Counseling Psychology and Special Education

Rights

http://lib.byu.edu/about/copyright/

Date Submitted

2010-09-06

Document Type

Dissertation

Handle

http://hdl.lib.byu.edu/1877/etd3970

Keywords

group psychotherapy, outcomes, selection, Group Selection Questionnaire

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